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't think it is the whole story. interestingly enough, countries like south korea and japan never had an influential feminist movement and are seeing similar success among women in school. i would add two other factors. the first is what barbara whitehead has called the girl project. by the 1990s, and that seems to be a real dividing.in my research is the change in the culture i'm describing here. by it the 1990s and actually starting even in the 80's, parents were engaging in a new kind of child or rather girl rearing. they were intent on creating a new breed of girls. self-confidence, ambitious -- that is the wrong slide. there we go, girl power. they were intent on creating a new breed of girl, self-confident, ambitious and even as some people put it a little cake cast. girls have their own little league teams they're there on television and movie shows, their own scholarships. the insistent message to girls, go forth and achieve. the other reason for women success i believe as changes in the economy that i talked about earlier. these changes were very friendly to women. for the mo
read about it. [laughter] in the 1980's, everyone in america it seemed was terrified of japan. the japanese had brought other high-profile things like that and if you mentioned some of that in your book. but japan ink disappeared and now we are sort of waiting for japan to be one of these dominoes because the debt is 200% of gdp. it's just government debt. is china the new japan? are we overstating what the0g0gg >> guest: i would say the realpg answer is idled because if i knew i would have treated thatpg already. >> guest: they have issues around demographics, but i think the fact of the matter in which the government is dealing with these things i think bodes well in that they are sort of playing a chess game, multiple moves ahead of most policymakers around the world. >> host: we have five minutes left. let's focus on solutions that our u.s. audience might not be interested in. you mentioned the housing crisis, and when i think of the housing crisis, it makes me very pessimistic. i read your book, and i like to think we basically have the government to the federal reserve w
enough countries like south korea and japan that never had an influential feminist movement are seeing similar success among women in school. i would add two other factors. the first is what barbara has called girl project. by the 1990s, and that seems to be a real dividing point in my research in the change of the culture that i'm describing here, by the 1990s, and actually starting in the '80s, parents were engaging in a new kind of child, or rather girl rearing. they were on, intent on creating a new breed of girl. self-confident, ambitious, and that's the wrong slide. okay. there we go. girl power. they were intent of creating a new breed of girl, self-confident, ambitious comic even as some people put it, a little kick. girls how to a little league team, their own television and movie show. their own scholarships. the incessant message to girls, go forth and achieve. the other reason for women's success i believe is changes in the economy that i talk about earlier. these changes were very friendly to women. for the most part up until the 1970s, women look for employment for the si
, countries like south korea and japan never had an influential feminist movement are seeing similar success among women in school. i would add two other factors. the first is what barbara defoe whitehead has called the girl project. by the 1990s, and that seems to be a real dividing point that i described here. by the 1990s and even starting in the '80s parents were gaenldz in a new kind of child or a rather girl-rearing. they were intent on creating a new breed of girl. self-confident, ambitious. that's the wrong one. okay. i'll go to the next -- there we go. girl power. they were intent on creating a new breed of girl, self-confident, ambitious even as some girls have said kick ass, they have their own tv and movie shows and their own scholarships. the message for girls, go forth and achieve. the other reason for women's success, i believe, is changes in the economy that i talked about earlier. these changes were very friendly to women. for the most part up until the 1970s, women looked for employment for the simple reason that they and their families needed the money. before that time,
is that potential. they -- their economy, they recently passed japan. back in the early '90s everyone thought japan was going to be the hegemon. but 1995 their economy hit a wall or hit a ceiling. it just, like, flattened out, and it hasn't grown since then. so maybe china's growth curve will flatten out for only season. by the way, their per capita gdp is like 8% of ours. their economy's growing, but they have so many people that they're really not that wealthy when you divide it out. also the question is do they have international aspirations like we do. and there's some indicators that they do and some that they don't. they're really not as active on the world stage as we are. they don't project power the way we do. they do it more kleopferly through agreements and things, and they do have some troops around the world but not that many yet. they also have offensive nuclear capability, and there's some story they're going to start looking into aircraft carriers. they have one they bought from the soviets in a fire sale after the wall came down. i think they turned it into an an amusing park somew
, there definitely is that potential. they recently passed japan. of course, if you go back to the early '90s, people thought japan was going to be the new hegemon. actually, their per cap la gdh was 150% of ours welcome then. but in 1995 their economy hit a wall or hit a ceiling. it just, like, flattens out. so maybe china's growth curve will just gnatten out for some reason -- flatten out for some reason. and and, by the way, their capita gdp is 8% of ours. they have so many people that they're really not spied al qaeda it out. also the question is do they have international aspirations like we do, and there's some indicators that they do and some they don't. they're really not as act air on the world stage as we are. they do it more cleverly through agreements and things, and ask can they do have some troops around the world, but not that many yet. they also have offensive nuclear capability, there's some story that they're going to start looking into aircraft carriers. have one that they bought from the soviets in the fire sale, it's parked somewhere as yoshes with u.n., some kind of display. but
with in japan came, quite honest in a gambit to get him out of prison so he became -- so he would be looked upon as a japanese citizen but he wasn't married to a japanese woman and they got married in prison toward the end of his life. he was in love with a 17-year-old girl when he was 49 years old. there were occasional romantic dalliances. i go into that in the book. thank you very much. [applause] >> frank brady discussing the life of bobby fischer on booktv. to see this and other programs on line go to booktv.org. watch robert and data bear talk about the comedy routine online on booktv.org on march 11th. the authors are both former cia agents and are married. they tell the story of their experiences in the cia in washington d.c.. at noon on friday go to booktv.org and click the watch button above program information and the featured programs section of the page. >> we are talking with jessica hughes about her book revolt. tell us about it. >> it is a book i wrote as a team party activists to give a good lehmann's explanation for why freedom is always the best choice in economics and persona
with, you know, among other people, japan, france, and other nations was a nation deeply, deeply changing, and by 1912, it was ready for the biggest change of all. milenia of imperial rule was coming to an end, and first ever chinese republic was being born. when that republic was born, these young men were china's founding fathers. the founder was a graduate, and his foreign minister was a graduate. the man who built railroads on the large scale across china was a graduate. the father of the commander of the chinese navy was a graduate and the founder of china's harvard was also a graduate. here's these young men talking in english and saying that's all right, old, boy, it'll be okay. this was the highlight of their lives. they were expecting that sooner or later china will thrive, and they were heart broken. china soon fell into a series of war lordism and after that, japanese invasion, after that, civil war, after that, communism. as these successful men turned old and frail, they watch as everything they worked to achieve was crumbing. here we are many, many decades later wal
all kinds of wars with among other people, japan, france and other nations as a nation deeply, deeply changing. and by 1912, it was ready for the biggest change of all. millennia of imperial rule were coming to an end and the first-ever chinese republic was being born. and when the republic was born, these young men became modern china's founding fathers. the prime minister of that republic was a graduate, his foreign minister was to graduate. many figured out how to build railroads on the large scale across canada with a graduate. the father of the commander of the chinese was a graduate was china's harvard was also a graduate. and here are all these young men walking around the forbidden city, talking to each other in english, saying things like that the right, old boy. it will be okay. this was the highlight of their lives. they were expecting that sooner or later china was very and they were heartbroken. china soon fell into a series of warbird of them and after that japanese invasion, after that, civil war. after that, communist. and as the successful men turned old and frail, th
fascinating times. china through the boxer rebellion through all kinds of wars with another's japan and other nations was a nation deeply changing and by 1912 it was ready for the biggest change of all. millennia of imperial rule were coming to an end and the first-ever chinese republic was being born. when that republic was born these young men became modern china's founding fathers. the prime minister of that republic was a graduate, the man who figured out how to build railroads across china was a graduate. the father of the chinese navy was a graduate and the university which is considered china's harvard, also a graduate. here were all these young men walking around the forbidden city talking to each other in english saying things like that's right, boy. it will be okay. this was the highlight of their lives. they were expecting that sooner or later china will thrive. they were heartbroken. china soon fell into a series of warlord is some and after that chinese -- japanese invention and after that civil war and communism. has these successful men turned old and frail they watched as ever
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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